An analysis of the passage the allegory of the unfaithful wife from ezekiel

Under the influence of Christ, men today would not speak in such harsh, realistic, even vulgar language which we find here; but the sad truth was that only this kind of brutally frank and honest language could get the attention of Israel.

An analysis of the passage the allegory of the unfaithful wife from ezekiel

There were, perhaps, few nations of antiquity in which the flame of patriotic feeling burned more brightly than in Israel. No people with a past such as theirs could be indifferent to the many elements of greatness embalmed in their history. To cherish a deep sense of the unique privileges which Jehovah had conferred on her in giving her a distinct place among the nations of the earth was thus a religious duty often insisted on in the Old Testament.

That this had actually taken place is a common complaint of the prophets. No prophet addresses himself to the task so remorselessly as Ezekiel. The utter worthlessness of Israel, both absolutely in the eyes of Jehovah and relatively in comparison with other nations, is asserted by him with a boldness and emphasis which at first startle us.

From a different point of view prophecy and its results might have been regarded as fruits of the national life, under the divine education vouchsafed to that people. He seizes on the fact that prophecy was in opposition to the natural genius of the people, and was not to be regarded as in any sense an expression of it.

Accepting the final attitude of Israel toward the word of Jehovah as the genuine outcome of her natural proclivities, he reads her past as an unbroken record of ingratitude and infidelity.

The first of these appears to be directed against the vain hopes cherished in Jerusalem at the time. It is not necessary to dwell on it at length. The image is simple and its application to Jerusalem obvious.

About this Blog

Earlier prophets had compared Israel to a vine, partly to set forth the exceptional privileges she enjoyed, but chiefly to emphasise the degeneration she had undergone, as shown by the bad moral fruits which she had borne.

But Ezekiel reminds his hearers that apart from its fruit the vine is the most worthless of trees. Even at the best its wood can be employed for no useful purpose; it is fit only for fuel. Such was the people of Israel, considered simply as a state among other states, without regard to its religious vocation.

Even in its pristine vigour, when the national energies were fresh and unimpaired, it was but a weak nation, incapable of attaining the dignity of a great power. But now the strength of the nation has been worn away by a long succession of disasters, until only a shadow of her former glory remains.

Israel is no longer like a green and living vine, but like a branch burned at both ends and charred in the middle, and therefore doubly unfit for any worthy function in the affairs of the world.

By the help of this illustration men may read in the present state of the nation the irrevocable sentence of rejection which Jehovah has passed on His people.

We now turn to the striking allegory of chapter 16, where the same subject is treated with far greater penetration and depth of feeling. There is no passage in the book of Ezekiel at once so powerful and so full of religious significance as the picture of Jerusalem, the foundling child, the unfaithful spouse, and the abandoned prostitute, which is here presented.

The general conception is one that might have been presented in a form as beautiful as it is spiritually true.

But the features which offend our sense of propriety are perhaps introduced with a stern purpose. In his own mind the feelings of moral indignation and physical disgust were very close together, and here he seems to work on the minds of his readers, so that the feeling excited by the image may call forth the feeling appropriate to the reality.

The allegory is a highly idealised history of the city of Jerusalem from its origin to its destruction, and then onward to its future restoration. It falls naturally into four divisions:The main figure in the allegory is Jerusalem in the guise of a female who turns out to be an unfaithful wife to Yhwh Elohim.

The allegory is developed in great detail. Jerusalem is first described as the daughter of an Amorite father and a Hittite mother.

An analysis of the passage the allegory of the unfaithful wife from ezekiel

Jul 26,  · (This imagery is very common in biblical literature, and Ezekiel uses the unfaithful wife motif extensively.) Jerusalem even sacrifices her children - the most tangible sign of the covenant with her husband God - to the false gods. Ezekiel seized upon the metaphor of the marriage covenant, so dramatically depicted in Hosea , expanded and elaborated it, and made it the startling "Allegory of the Unfaithful Wife," fully meriting the brutal and sadistic punishment of adulteresses in ancient times.

Allegory of the Unfaithful Wife The passage that will be discussed in this paper is The Allegory of the Unfaithful Wife found in Ezekiel (New Oxford Annotated . Expositor's Bible Commentary. Ezekiel There is no passage in the book of Ezekiel at once so powerful and so full of religious significance as the picture of Jerusalem, the foundling child, the unfaithful spouse, and the abandoned prostitute, which is here presented.

(Ezekiel ff.) the allegory takes a new turn through . That's certainly not what a mise en scene analysis of the untouchables young job seekers are an analysis of the occultation of orion by mr longfellow An analysis of the passage the allegory of the unfaithful wife from ezekiel saying.

Youth unemployment is the unemployment of young people, defined by the United Nations as 15–24 years old.

The Marriage of Hosea and Jehovah's Covenant | Religious Studies Center