The social and legal problems facing transgender people in todays society

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The social and legal problems facing transgender people in todays society

Share via Email States and healthcare providers have inconsistent policies with regard to transgender people, often putting them at risk of discrimination. For a year and a half, it wasn't an issue. But in December, Coy's school informed her parents that she would no longer be permitted to use the girls' restroom.

She would have to use the boys' room, the staff bathroom or the one in the nurse's office. Because Coy was assigned male at birth. Coy is one of many transgender and gender-nonconforming children in the United States who face discrimination, harassment and bullying — from adults and kids alike — simply for existing.

Coy's school didn't report any problems with her using the girls' room; they barred her from it nonetheless, singling her out for a special bathroom.

According to a letter from the school's lawyer, published by the New York Times: Discrimination against transgender people is real, pervasive and often legal. And it often builds from ignorance and bias — things that start young. One of the things we see in transgender rights advocacy is that people just don't know a lot about transgender people and what it means to be transgender.

One of our most effective advocacy tools is education. While transgender people do face widespread mistreatment, the discrimination doesn't make much sense.

Who, exactly, gets hurt if folks match their physical appearance to their gender identity? Why is it such a problem for a six-year-old girl to use the girls' bathroom? Everyone has a gender identity. You do, and so do I. Just as the gay rights movement has made us collectively realize that we all have a sexual orientation — whether it be straight, gay, lesbian, bisexual or something else — advocates for transgender rights try to impart the lesson that each person has an internal sense of being male or female or, for some folks, neither, or something in between.

We just never have to think about if it we're not transgender because no one questions it. For transgender people, it doesn't. It shouldn't be that big of a deal: Mary's gender identity lines up with her gender assigned at birth, and Suzie's doesn't. Mary is Mary, Suzie is Suzie.

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Many of us take steps to match our gender identity with our physical appearance, even if we aren't fully conscious of it — I identify as a woman, and I wear my hair long, pluck my eyebrows, shave my legs and sometimes wear skirts.

Many transgender people do the same thing, and seek to match up who they are on the inside with the social, cultural and physical markers on the outside — by wearing clothes typical of their gender, taking hormones, changing their names or having surgery. They're met with continual resistance.

While states make it relatively easy for women to change their names when they get married, changing your name to match your gender can be a laborious process.

It often requires getting a court order from a sympathetic judge, signed and notarized affidavits from friends or family members and, in some states, paying for a newspaper ad to announce your new identity.

The path to physical transition can be rife with roadblocks. For transgender people who want to undergo medical treatment, being withheld transition-related healthcare is just as devastating as being withheld any other form of medical care. But most insurance companies have healthcare exclusions that block payment for transition-related care, and most state Medicaid programs don't pay for gender transition, either.

That means transgender people are often stuck paying for their most basic healthcare out of pocket, to the tune of tens of thousands of dollars. The many transgender people who can't afford care are left without it; some turn to below-the-radar, freelance "doctors" with little to no medical training.

Procedures are routinely botched, disfiguring, maiming or even killing people. By contrast, if a person whose gender identity matches their physical characteristics at birth "cisgender"but then a hormonal imbalance changes their physical appearance contrary to that — if a woman grows significant amounts of dark facial hair, or if a man develops breasts — health insurance typically covers treatment.

Transgender people can also be fired from their jobs, denied housing and generally discriminated against with no legal recourse in many US states. Transgender youth face high rates of bullying, homelessness, abuse and physical and sexual assault.

I realize this all sounds quite dire. While transgender people do face tremendous challenges from discrimination and bigotry, most transgender people live just like everyone else: Yet, the obstacles transgender people face are almost entirely social constructs: We can choose differently.

We can choose to treat our fellow human beings as human beings, and not as unnatural threats to a gendered order of society or as cruel punchlines. The best place to start is in schools. Silverman sees this, too:The Most Popular Social Issues of See where voters are polling on the most popular Social issues of Social issues are those which affect the human society as a whole.

These issues are pertaining human behavior, including government policies, religious conflicts, gender inequalities, economic disparities, etc. Aug 22,  · What 'transgender' means, and how society views it. A report suggests nearly , transgender people in USA; Medical issues for transgendered people go beyond surgery.

Highlighting some major problems faced by LGBT people across the world is the theme of this article. Key Words: LGBT, Marginalization and Social Exclusion, Homophobia, Criminalization of homosexuality.

The social and legal problems facing transgender people in todays society

Transgender people can also be fired from their jobs, denied housing and generally discriminated against with no legal recourse in many US states. Of the LGBT hate-murders committed in , transgender people accounted for 44% of victims, with trans people of color disproportionately targeted.

Transgender youth face high rates of bullying, homelessness, abuse and physical and sexual assault. On the ballot is a question that could repeal a law prohibiting discrimination against transgender people in public places.

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